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Ending Rheumatic Heart Disease is achievable if we put our heads and minds to it
Ending Rheumatic Heart Disease is achievable if we put our heads and minds to it Preventable, yet persistent, Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is the most commonly acquired heart disease in people under 25 years of age. The World Heart Federation (WHF) is committed to the fight to ensure cardiovascular health for everyone. Through WHF’s network of Members and the power of personal testimonials, we are spreading awareness that RHD can be prevented, diagnosed, and treated. This editorial was authored by WHF Director of Policy and Advocacy Jeremiah Mwangi and was first published in FORESIGHT Global Health on 19 August 2021.


Dear colleagues!
Dear colleagues! I welcome you on behalf of the Organizing Committee of the XI International Forum for Cardiology and Internal Medicine, which will be held from March 22 to 24, 2022 in Moscow.


Editorial Activity

cardiology book

COVID-19 vaccine benefits still outweigh risks, despite possible rare heart complications. Statement from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association
COVID-19 vaccine benefits still outweigh risks, despite possible rare heart complications. Statement from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Late last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) alerted health care professionals that they are monitoring the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) for cases of young adults developing the rare heart-related complication myocarditis, after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna.


Administration of patients during and after a coronavirus pandemic. Interview with professor Mekhman N. Mamedov.
Administration of patients during and after a coronavirus pandemic. Interview with professor Mekhman N. Mamedov. Dear Colleagues! On April 27, 2021, at the initiative of the Indonesian Society of Cardiology, an online meeting was held with one of the leading experts of Russia in the cardiology, Professor Mekhman N. Mamedov



Six pregnancy complications are among red flags  for heart disease later in life. American Heart Association Scientific Statement
Six pregnancy complications are among red flags for heart disease later in life. American Heart Association Scientific Statement Six pregnancy-related complications - high blood pressure, gestational diabetes, preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age delivery, pregnancy loss or placental abruption – increase a woman’s risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association, published today in the Association’s flagship journal Circulation.


X International forum of cardiology and internal medicine
X International forum of cardiology and internal medicine Dear Colleagues! The jubilee X International Forum of Cardiology and Internal medicine in the online format has completed. Event diaries, abstract book, forum report, and full versions of video recordings of lectures are presented at the links


Eating meat ‘raises risk of heart disease, diabetes and pneumonia
Eating meat ‘raises risk of heart disease, diabetes and pneumonia UK researchers find link between regular meat intake and nine non-cancerous illnesses. Eating meat regularly increases a person’s risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, pneumonia and other serious illnesses, research has found.


COVID-19 Vaccination for Healthcare Workers. What You Need to Know
COVID-19 Vaccination for Healthcare Workers. What You Need to Know As most of the world hopes for an end to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, trust in a vaccine provides a glimmer of hope. Limited quantities of 2 anti-COVID-19 vaccines are available in the United States, mandating prioritizing populations for vaccination. Healthcare workers (HCW) are key on the list, as they are on COVID-19 care front lines and are at high risk for exposure and transmission.


Current Overview on Hypercoagulability in COVID-19
Current Overview on Hypercoagulability in COVID-19 The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has brought many unique pathologies, such as coagulopathy, prompting a desperate need for effective management. COVID-19-associated coagulopathy (CAC) can cause various thromboembolic complications, especially in critically ill patients.