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Weight-Adjusted Aspirin Dosing:  Evidence Builds in Primary Prevention
Weight-Adjusted Aspirin Dosing: Evidence Builds in Primary Prevention Low-dose aspirin intended for primary prevention, typically 75 to 100 mg once daily, doesn"t protect against cardiovascular events in persons who weigh at least 70 kg (about 154 pounds), suggests a patient-level analysis of randomized trials that included more than 100,000 patients. But daily aspirin at higher dosages, usually at least 300 mg, was cardioprotective in that group, as was low-dose aspirin in people who weighed less than 70 kg.


New ADA/EASD Guidance on Diabetes: Assess CV Status First
New ADA/EASD Guidance on Diabetes: Assess CV Status First The treatment approach to type 2 diabetes should begin with an assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) status, other comorbidities, and patient preferences, according to a draft of the upcoming 2018 joint consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). The final version of the 2018 update to the current 2015 ADA/EASDManagement of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes statement (Diabetes Care.2015;38:140-149) will be presented on October 5, 2018 at the EASD annual meeting in Berlin and will be published in Diabetes Care and Diabetologia.


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Expert opinion. Double antiplatelet therapy after ACS: "de-escalation" In medical practice, cases in which patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and received a combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) with prasugrel or ticagrelor are often used, a combination of ASA with clopidogrel is started. This transition from more active platelet-derived P2Y12 blockers to less active clopidogrel has been termed "de-escalation." The possibility of "de-escalation" is considered in documents prepared by various expert groups. Among them, an updated version of the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Association of Cardio Thoracic Surgeons for double antiplatelet therapy for coronary heart disease, where a similar transition is proposed to be discussed with side effects or intolerance of prasugrel / ticagrelor. There is also an agreement of experts from Europe and the USA, in which practical approaches to the replacement of the P2Y12 blocker of the platelet receptor are analyzed in detail. However, it should be borne in mind that these proposals are basically based on common sense and representations of the pharmacological properties of various P2Y12 receptor blockers of the platelet, while the evidence base for "de-escalation" is small.


SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS - 71ST WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY
SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS - 71ST WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY Global resolution on Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease adopted at the WHA Following years of campaigning and advocacy from WHF, our members and the global RHD community, we are delighted to announce that on Friday 25 May, Member States of the World Health Organization unanimously adopted a Global Resolution on Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease at the World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland.


Bread Might Be The Saltiest Part Of Your Diet, According To A New Study
Bread Might Be The Saltiest Part Of Your Diet, According To A New Study When you think of salty foods, bread might not come to mind. But a new study shows that it may be a bigger contributor to sodium in your diet than you think. Even though it doesn"t taste that salty, bread might be delivering more sodium than you think — but it all depends on which kind you eat and how much, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed 2,000 different breads (including white, wholemeal, mixed grain, and flatbreads) sold in 32 countries around the world and found some shockingly high numbers and wide variation in the salt and sodium levels in breads. The study was conducted by the World Action on Salt & Health (WASH) at the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine of Queen Mary University of London.


The Anti-statin Lobby Strikes Again:  Time to Set the Record Straight
The Anti-statin Lobby Strikes Again: Time to Set the Record Straight The joint Franco-German non-commercial television network ARTE recently broadcast a television programme entitled "The Big Bluff" about the link between cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, and the use of statins. The programme propounded the theory that there is absolutely no relation between blood cholesterol levels and cardiovascular disease, and asserted that cholesterol has become the "ideal villain" in cardiovascular disease through a series of "scientific approximations". In addition, the programme encouraged physicians and patients to interrupt lipid-lowering treatments and statins, in particular, to avoid any blood lipid assessment and last but not least, suggested that the recommendations issued by professional societies such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) are inappropriate and influenced by conflicts of interest.


Coffee Consumption and Coronary Artery Calcium Score: Cross‐Sectional Results of ELSA‐Brasil (Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health)
Coffee Consumption and Coronary Artery Calcium Score: Cross‐Sectional Results of ELSA‐Brasil (Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health) Coffee Consumption and Coronary Artery Calcium Score: Cross‐Sectional Results of ELSA‐Brasil (Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health) Abstract Background Available evidence for the relationship between coffee intake and subclinical atherosclerosis is limited and inconsistent. This study aimed to evaluate the association between coffee consumption and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in ELSA‐Brasil (Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health).


CONFERENCE NEWS
CONFERENCE NEWS CONFERENCE NEWS https://www.medscape.com/viewcollection/ MOMENTUM 3: HeartMate 3 Improves Stroke-Free Survival at 2 Years TRIUMPH: Triple Low-Dose Combo Pill a Success in Hypertension Barbershop-Based Healthcare Cuts Hypertension in Blacks Music Boosts Exercise Capacity During Cardiac Stress Test


New EHRA Practical Guide  on Novel Oral Anticoagulants
New EHRA Practical Guide on Novel Oral Anticoagulants A new version of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) practical guide on non–vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) aims to help physicians navigate various new data — including some just presented last month in the United States — but also a more complex clinical landscape. "As health care providers get more comfortable using NOACs, treatment of more complex patients, such as the elderly, frail, those with multiple co-medications, is getting increasingly more common. We felt that not only an update but a fully revised version would be appropriate," writing committee chair, Jan Steffel, MD, University Heart Center, Zurich, Switzerland, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.



THE THIRD DAY OF THE FORUM Today is the final day of the Forum. The scientific program continues until 5.30 pm in parallel 4 halls. The activity of doctors increased, discussions and questions became substantive. Delegates during breaks linger in the halls and behind the scenes continue to exchange opinions with the lecturers. The number of graduate students from medical universities has increased noticeably. Volunteers in each hall and check-in desks conduct a survey on a 5-point system in various areas, including the organization of the forum and the quality of reports and symposia. This will help optimize our work. Participants of the exhibition express their gratitude for the active participation of delegates and lively interest.